What I’m Reading This Week (5/11/16)

Another week of flitting between books trying to find something to hold me.

coverI finished reading The Ginger Man and I’m not sure how I feel about it. Oh it’s very well written and gives an evocative sense of Dublin at the time (the late 1940s), but I had a real problem with the hero, Sebastian Dangerfield. Although he is an American he comes across as very Irish. I had to keep reminding myself of his nationality. Then there is his behaviour and attitudes. I know he’s a fictional character and that even unpleasant characters can be likeable. But, in the end, I just found him to be someone I didn’t want to spend any more time with. I finished the book, but I had to push myself to do so.

So then I was looking for something else to read. I was browsing one or two blogs when I came across a review of Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury, which you can read here. coverThis was another book I had read many years before and had thought about starting again. So after reading the review I started reading it. I had forgotten what a great stylist Bradbury was. Like The Ginger Man it’s very evocative of time and place, this time (I think) 1950s small town America. Anyway, I’ve read about a quarter of the book, am enjoying it and will be reading the rest over the next few days.

I started several other books this week (as usual) but haven’t stuck with any of them except the one I’ve just almost finished, Late Call by Angus Wilson. coverThis is set in an English new town in the early 1960s and is the story of a retired hotel manager, Sylvia Calvert who, with her husband, goes to live with their son, a headmaster, in Carshall New Town. What’s interesting, apart from Sylvia’s internal life, are the undercurrents and tensions running between all the main characters – Sylvia and her husband and son, her husband and various people, her son and his children – and the various problems and challenges of living in a new town. I have thoroughly enjoyed it and will definitely be reading more of Wilson’s books.

 

 

After I’ve finished Late Call, and have read the rest of the Bradbury, I’m tempted to reread another book I haven’t read for many years, Dune by Frank Herbert. I’ll let you know how that goes next week, same time, same station.cover

What I’m Reading This Week (29/10/16)

Another week, another batch of books (although most have only been part read).

Last week I wrote a bit about Flann O’Brien; I had started rereading The Hard Life and was reminiscing about a long-ago holiday in Ireland. Well, I finished the book, enjoyed it and, as is my wont, immediately looked for something else to read. I did what I generally tend to do when looking for something to read – scroll through the books on my Kobo to see what strikes my fancy.

I started several books but, at first, couldn’t find anything that I wanted to spend a day or two reading; My Booky Wook by  Russell Brand (might be fun but not what I was looking for), Wounds to Bind by Jerry Burgan (about the birth of folk-rock in the US, focusing on the group that Burgan was in, We Five, who I’ve never heard of. Interesting but, again, not quite what was needed), The Shape of Water by Andrea Camilleri (the first novel about Inspector Montalbano. My wife and I enjoyed watching these on TV and the novel seems promising but, again, not just now).

Then I came across a book that seemed as though it would satisfy my needs, Selling the Sixties: the pirates and pop music radio by Robert Chapman. 

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I remember the pirates. When I was at school, Morecambe Grammar in the early to mid-sixties, I used to listen to Radio Caroline on a transistor radio while on my way to school on the bus. There was little else to listen to, the BBC was rubbish if you wanted to hear pop music, and Radio Luxembourg was better but the reception was lousy. So Radio Caroline was the answer to a prayer. It started broadcasting from Ramsey Bay in the Isle of Man on 6th July 1964, a year before I finished school.

I can remember some of the music that was played; Tobacco Road by The Nashville Teens was definitely one, and a song I still think is fantastic, The Days of Pearly Spencer by David McWilliams, an Irish singer-songwriter who, I believe, should have been better known.

All in all an fascinating book, but probably only to those who have an interest in the pirates. Continue reading