Books! Books! So Many Books! (even more)

Continuing the list of books which have made an impression over the last ten years(ish).

Until I Find You by John Irving

coverI’m not sure if this was the first book by Irving I had read and I’m not sure if it’s my very favourite as I have read all of them over the last few years and enjoyed them all. I suppose it was a toss-up between this, The Cider House Rules and The World According to Garp.

Until I Find You is a book about memory, the memories of the adult Jack of his childhood. The novel follows Jack from childhood, as the son of a tattoo-artist mother in Toronto, through to adulthood, taking in themes of abandonment by his father, abuse and the search for a family. Geographically it moves from Canada through parts of Europe to the United States. I found it rich and evocative with memorable characters and an engaging storyline.

If you like a good story well written I would recommend any of Irving’s novels.

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

wehavealwayslivedinthecastleThis is the story of the Blackwood sisters, Mary Katherine (‘Merricat’) and Constance, who live with their uncle, Julian, in a rambling house with extensive grounds near a village. The rest of the family died six years earlier, poisoned at dinner and, since then, Constance has not left the house. Constance was charged with the murder as she was the only one at the meal who wasn’t poisoned (the poison was in the sugar and she didn’t have sugar on her blackberries), but was acquitted at trial. Uncle Julian was poisoned though he survived, although his wife was one of the victims. Merricat wasn’t at the dinner as she had been sent to bed as a punishment.

Bit by bit the story comes out, partly through the notes uncle Julian is constantly making for his proposed autobiography. A cousin, Charles, arrives and begins to get close to Constance, although Merricat is suspicious of him. I won’t say any more about the plot as I don’t want to spoil it. It’s a strongly atmospheric story giving a strong and sinister sense of the house, the grounds and the two sisters. Jackson is a terrific writer and deserves to be much better known. She was an influence on, among others, Stephen King and Neil Gaiman.

I would also recommend her novel The Haunting of Hill House and short story The Lottery. Continue reading